Friday, May 26, 2017

Roubo's Tool Chest: Frame Saw


This set is something I've been working toward for a long time. A frame saw for resawing boards to thickness and a couple of dedicated kerfing planes to aid the endeavor. Being able to resaw your boards to different thicknesses from what is available off the shelf helps bring your projects to another level of creativity and freedom.

I used the hardware only version of Mark Harrell's Bad Axe Roubo Frame saw kit. Mark threw me a template he had scaled to match the 48" two-man saw Roubo illustrated only on a more manageable one man plate around 30"


Mark's kit and hardware are fantastic! I supplied my own white oak and some of my own ideas and in a couple days of shop time (an hour or two when I can) I have a this wonderful object that helps me parse grain. Mark's reputation as a saw maker doesn't need my poor words to pile on, just trust when I say he's not satisfied until he has things worked out to hit the sweet spot of function. I stopped by his shop to see some of the new things he has in the works and used on of his pre-built saws while I was there.

No kerfing plane used. This thing still tracks a pencil line like a laser beam.


Of course we have Tom Fidgen to thank for bringing these saws and kits to a kind of modern rebirth. After he jumped in the pool and told us the water was fine, many of us gladly played follow the leader.


At testament to the quality, here's the saw face of my saw's test cut in walnut. I was super impressed with the surface left behind, other than the center where the grain failed and the pieces popped apart, this surface would take minimal clean up to make presentable. This is superior to the resaw surface I used to get from my bandsaw with an expensive blade!

So in answer to the question, why would you resaw boards/veneer/ anything by hand if you could just throw it through a bandsaw instead. It's not the novelty, or the workout, it's results like this. The frame saw doesn't take that much longer to actually work. there's no set up/fences/squaring/test cutting to do. Swipe around with the kerfing plane (or don't) and receive nearly finished results.


Every once in awhile I will build a project without doing much documenting. This was one of those so there's not much for process photos. Just the hero shots of the finished product.




One note to clean up. I consider Mark Harrell a friend, but even if I hated the SOB I'd throw my money at him. The depth of knowledge he has assimilated about saws, their function and use and how all the minutia relates to their performance is awe inspiring. Yes I get to go hang out in his shop every so often and see what's cooking and if that makes you jealous . . . I'm ok with that.

Ratione et Passionis
Oldwolf

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

An Unyielding Fascination


I've been playing with new toys and contemplating different games. Working with new materials and learning new skills. I recently purchased the 3D printed parts of the hero gun from the movie Hellboy. I cleaned the parts up, sanded them, fit them together so things moved and and the fake bullets can be exchanged. I painted the prop and weathered the finish. I've been drawing more and more movie props and similar inspired builds in my sketchbook.

I've been playing with casting small pieces and finishing them. I've been reading and learning techniques to build from foam and looking into wiring LED lights and writing code for small circuit board computers like Raspberry Pi. My mind is filled with polycarbonate and LED lightsaber blades, aluminum, brass and steel alloys, tricorders, Weta Workshop, and Guillermo Del Toro.

 I have always been a big geek for comic books, fantasy and sci-fi books, Dungeons & Dragons, and movies. Realizing I have the skills (or can develop the skills) to bring some of the magic into my hands has been a revelation and probably the start of an obsession.


And yet. . . .

And still . . .

I know where my roots lie. There is something about wood that is unlike any other material. It is living and exists on it's own accord without the smelting of fires or the fuzzing of electrons. It carries a warmth of texture and a varying nature that makes it a challenge to subjugate to your will. It asks a toll of you, requires you spend the ultimate resource of time to get to know it, (and still it will surprise you) There are skills to develop. A multitude of skills to develop and maintain.

It is unlike anything else, and it is endlessly fascinating to me.

I can't help but inspect nearly every off-cut I make. The fractal lines of grain and the balance of weakness and strength. I enjoy snapping them in two like a destructive toddler. Sometimes I even lift them to my nose and smell them. I pay nearly as much attention to the small buttons of wood I remove cutting dovetails.

Along with the off-cuts comes shavings, sawdust, carving chips, and finished pieces. A bottomless love affair with whip cream and sprinkles on top.


I may wander, but I know where home is. I may roam, but I know where my heart lies. Some folks need church, I just need my workshop. The wonders of the universe at the tips of my fingers.

Encapsulated in a simple board of white oak.

Ratione et Passionis
Oldwolf

Tuesday, May 2, 2017

Kerfing Planes In Wisconsin Part 2

Back from philosophising to sawdust slinging, or more correctly tool making. If you want to refresh where we left off on these kerfing planes the first installment is HERE.

Tool making is it's own deep subset within the greater woodworking community. There are folks out there like Jim Hendricks who spend a lot of energy collecting, restoring, and creating rare and wonderful hand tools. My hat is off to Jim and others like him (a dozen other names come to mind) and their obsession.

Though I dip my toes in the pool from time to time I know it's not for me. It is far more worth my time to buy a well made tool than muck around on my own. I will make them, (I have a half set of Roubo hollows and rounds on the short list) but one of the BIG reasons I migrated from power tools to hand tools is I was tired of making jigs to make furniture. I do harbor some of the same feelings about making my own tools.

But as there aren't a ton of prefinished kerfing planes or re-saw frames out there (Mark Harrell is selling a finished resaw kit now!!) my hand is forced.


Working off the template I made from the match planes I used for inspiration I had finished making the major cuts on the body. It was time to start shaping things to work.


I predrilled the radii for the handle and then roughed out the rest of the handle shape using a coping saw and a regular hand saw for the straight cuts. I cleaned up the flat cuts with a block plane and chisel and started to dig out my files and rasps to work on the handles.


Then danger struck! I had a somewhat independent thought. Shhh... please don't inform the NSA. My back was a little sore and it was a very nice autumn day and I was wishing I could work in the sun out on the gazebo. Sitting in a favorite chair instead of standing hunched over a vise. I connected those thoughts to the pleasantly lightly faceted surface of the spoons I sometimes carve and thought it would make an equally pleasant surface to hold as a saw handle.

I grabbed my Morakniv and moved to the sunshine. All too quickly I had the handles imperfectly perfect to touch. This really is my favorite part of this whole build and I will probably continue this trend in future tool endeavors


Sawing the kerf to fit the blade was another operation I needed to nail. No wavering in the cut, no patented Olson brand screwing up. I cut and planed shims to a measurement a wee bit thicker than 1/2" 1/4" and 1/8". The extra thickness will come off with a plane blade in the future. I put these shims in the mouth of the plane and ran my tenon saw tight up against the shim to make the cut.

The tenon saw plate is slightly beefier than the kerfing saw plate and will make moving the kerfing plate from one body to another easier.


Holes were marked and drilled for the saw nuts. Here after some time I am thinking about talking to Mark and upgrading from the softer brass to steel fasteners as they will see more "in and out" of the saw body than your average saw nuts would. Maybe in the future I will upgrade to a saw plate for each plane body but we will see where the need falls over time first.


A little stamp marking and some danish oil followed by paste wax for a finish and the kerfing planes were done. Then a decent sized commission fell into my lap and I had to put aside the re saw plane until a later date. Should be starting that any day now.

Ratione et Passionis
Oldwolf

Thursday, April 20, 2017

Transformative By Nature


My wife occasionally reminds me that my relationship with tools is outside the bell curve of normal. The following thoughts may be proof of this.

With some tools there is a learning curve. You have to figure them out before you get consistent results. I think of my Veritas plow plane this way. It wasn't immediately intuitive to a dummy like me and I had to learn her idiosyncrasies (and get an upgraded depth stop from the company) before I was happy. This isn't a deal breaker in my world, I'm happy to get to know a tool well if we're going to have a long term relationship. Many of my planes and I have had this courtship.

Occasionally tools spring into your hand ready to go. Often it's because I payed my dues with a similar tool before finding this one. I taught myself good sawing technique on a self sharpened old Disston backsaw with a slightly warped plate. So when my first Bad Axe Saw found it's way home it was amazing.


But there are a small percentage of tools that signify a paradigm shift in my shop techniques. They change the way I solve problems and even view my work in the shop. Around a year ago this Morakniv 120 arrived in the mail. I bought it to add to my spoon carving kit, but it didn't live in that tool roll for long. It doesn't even go in my tool chest, it hangs on one of the pegs over my workbench and other than my holdfasts and bench mallet, is the most quickly accessible tool in my shop.


Last fall as I was building a set of kerfing planes and it became time to shape the handle, I decided to rough out the grip with the knife before reaching for the rasps, but once I worked down to a point I came to really like the lightly faceted feel on the knife carved handle. It transfered that "touch" to the tool's feel that's so elusive. So I slowed a bit and made better, finer, smoothing cuts to finish by knofe only. Treating the handles as I might the handle of a spoon.

This knife simply answers the call of duty every time without complaint. It came to me very sharp and it holds it's edge for a long time and is still easy to maintain with a charged leather strop. The wooden handle is modifiable but honestly I found it comfortable and responsive out of the box. The only thing I don't like, that keeps me from strapping it to my belt, is the plastic sheath. I suppose I should just find someone to make one for me out of leather. All in due time I suppose.

So there you go. Even the simplest of tools can be transformative to your shop time when they are designed and crafted just right.

Ratione et Passionis
Oldwolf


P.S. 
This love letter is unsolicited and unsupported. I was not asked by MoraKniv to write this nor have I recieved anything from them. I was using this knife in my shop this week and this post formulated in the joy of the shavings coming off the blade. 
Cheers. 
D

Friday, April 14, 2017

Do I Look Like A Guy With A Plan?

Please don't answer that. I already know. This post will catch several threads of my life and shop so hold on.

I just finished reading Nancy Hiller's "Making Things Work." (You don't need me to tell you what an entertaining read it is, there are plenty of bigger hitters out there giving the book lots of deserved sunshine)  It came into my hands at the perfect time. I don't take many commissions for work but over the winter came one I couldn't refuse. I pulled it off and the client was wonderful, but by the time I delivered the pieces I was tired.

Not physically, or really mentally. The word I have is spiritually exhausted. It was probably six weeks or a little more before I meaningfully stepped back into the shop to do anything. Still now I am only getting my sea legs back underneath me. The batteries were just depleted and took a while to charge, but it gave me time to think.

A dangerous pass time I know.

I know I'm not cut out to build furniture full time for other people. I knew that without Nancy's book. Still it leaves to question; What do I want from all this? Mostly I just want to answer the questions I have for myself instead of blindly trusting the words of others. If I could make a perfect career out of my shop time, it would involve experimenting, then writing and teaching about those experiments.

I'm guess I'm just a stubborn old viking who likes to steer his own longship tiller. 

If that's what I want, how do I move from here to there?

I've spent the last few months planning and working on some things adjacent to directly making sawdust.


Last summer I spent a week around Tom Fidgen as he taught a class at Mark Harrell's Bad Axe Saw Emporium. We spoke a little about his Unplugged Woodshop project and I was very impressed to see how much he accomplished combining video from his cell phone and a GoPro camera on a tripod. I enjoy shooting video but after I see what I've done a few months removed I dislike the unsophisticated production value.

So I also upgraded to some professional level video editing software.

I've only started playing with things and the software learning curve will take a bit to be efficient/proficient, but it's like learning any other new skill. You eat the elephant one bite at a time.

As a start I decided to create a quick introduction sequence for my videos, the results are embedded below. Being highly critical, the intro isn't more than 80% there, but it's an improvement. 

Other irons in the fire?

I am starting a production run of chests based on a six board style with a slant top and interior drawers. The plan is to build seven to eight of the same chest and keep close track of my time and work. I think there's an interesting article in this as you don't often hear about hand tools in a production situation and the implications. It doesn't seem like something up the alley of the Usual Suspect magazines though. We will see if I can entice any takers.

After the chest run I have to pick back up with building the furniture shown in the Morgan Bible. I've second guessed and delayed this project long enough. Abandoning it half done is not an option (I have my pride) I don't know if anyone will take it from me or if I will have to publish on my own. Either option is fine. The project is like a broken tooth in my mind that I'm always testing with my tongue.

The good news is the time has allowed me to decipher exactly what I'm trying to say with the book. Believe it or not the furniture itself has become support material for an argument promoting experimental archeology and the concept of finding things out for yourself through practical application over just reading what some joker writes in a book or on a blog.

Translation: If you really want to find out what it feels like to wear medieval armor you shouldn't just read what Dr. Blabberblaster has written in his dissertation reviewing the existing literature of the weight of armor in correlated medieval grave finds. You should go find some chain-maile and strap it on. Not that aluminum Hollywood shit either, find the real steel stuff as close to accurate as possible.

Then go figure out how to move, run, and fight in it. Spend all day wearing it. Figure out how to take it off. The experience yields such a broader understanding


The third iron is a longer game and the threads are only starting to weave together. For a long time I've been frustrated with much woodworking media, (including my efforts) and its masturbatory nature. In essence most spends it's work on preaching to the already converted, but I've wanted to find a way to bring the good word to others. Missionary woodworking to bring more bodies into the flock. If it works then it may go farther to support that "Experiment, write, and teach," dream I seem to be chasing.

Believe it or not, I found the answer at my local comic book shop. . . .

Stay tuned

Ratione et Passionis
Oldwolf

Friday, March 31, 2017

It All Takes Time



























Last summer I was hanging out for a week at Mike Seimsen's Home for Wayward Woodworkers  during one of his handtool immersion weeks. The concept is to take a handful of younger folks interested in the craft and get them up and running with tuned up "previously loved" tools and a tool chest to carry them home in.

One evening, during an after dinner drink (or two or more) I was telling Mike what an awesome experience this was for the students. "I wish I'd had this opportunity when I was beginning to figure it out."

"Hell," said Mike, "How do you think I felt. Nobody was writing, or even talking about hand tools when I was starting. You has Chris (Schwarz) and the internet!"

He was right of course. I had great teachers and influencers to draw from. (Mike included) but I've also had the sustained time in the saddle that has taken things I've read, seen, and heard and  allowed me to amalgamate them into my personal style. I'm still learning I"M STILL LEARNING. and so we all should be, but it all takes time.

The short attention span theater is all around us. It permeates our everyday and almost all of us carry in our pockets a little index card sized dopamine dosing machine designed to keep our divided attentions divided. Instant information and gratification at the swipe of a finger in a tool too useful to ignore. But mastering a skill, a craft like woodworking is not something you can download or plug in. It takes time.

It requires making mistakes, A LOT OF MISTAKES. It requires abandoning failed projects and clinging to desperate ones. It requires time on your feet at the bench, sweat dripping onto your boards and it requires long car rides with the radio off to contemplate, problem solve, and plan. It requires constant evaluation, self competition, and sometimes competing with those who don't know it and sometimes competing with those who are long dead. It requires you put in the time and effort. It all takes time.

The good news is that it doesn't judge. Your tool chest won't mind if it's closed for a year, it's patient. It will wait until you're ready. A little sharpening and you can be off and spending more time. The skills are only slightly perishable. The familiarity will diminish some but the human hand is amazing. It will remember quicker than you expect.

You can get there, but you do need to spend the currency of time.



























Ratione et Passionis
Oldwolf

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

A Thoughtful Change


I land all over the bell curve in a large number of my life's pursuits, but one thing I am exceedingly good at is monogamy. I've been married for closing in on a quarter century. My pickup had close to 300,000 miles on it, and typically once I find a brand of something I like, from ketchup to underwear, I will go far out of my way to buy that brand. 

Until someone sells the brand and it changes . . . it almost always changes for the worse. I hate that. But I guess that figures into my monogamy pathology too. 

When I heard Chris Schwarz preach the concept of "Sharpening Monogamy" I was all in. The idea that your sharpening gets better, regardless of media, simply by sticking with one system works for me. The repetition allows you to refine your process and achieve good and repeatable results. In the end a consistent result is probably the most important and undebatable aspect of sharpening there is.

For a long time I've been sharpening using grades of automotive sand paper. It's a great place to start sharpening. It has a low buy in price and you can create excellent, repeatable results and for a long time that's what I've stuck with. I use 6 grades of paper 320, 400, 600, 1000, 1500, and 2000 grit, I sharpen a bevel straight up in an eclipse style jig. No micro bevels. If the blade doesn't fit in the jig - I freehand it. I also lightly use David Charlesworth Ruler Trick

I try not to make sharpening precious. It's a simple maintenance task to pass through and get back to work. However, because no relationship is perfect there are things I dislike about the system. 

First, even though it's a cheap initial buy into good sharpening results, overtime it will become the most expensive method out there. It's a slow death from a thousand paper cuts but I'm sure since I started using the system around 2010 I've spent enough to buy into most other systems and then some. 

Second, and the final deal breaker. All sharpening systems are inherently messy. Oil or water and steel slurry are part of the deal with stones. Sandpaper involves stinky spray adhesive, fine particles of steel dust that can become airborne and changing out the paper regularly. I use flat marble tiles as my substrate and over time I've gotten so tired of the process of peeling the old paper off, scraping the dirt and remaining adhesive off, then spraying and gluing down new. If your aren't meticulous all the way along the process the paper bubbles or wrinkles, even imperceptibly. As you're applying blade to abrasive, the corner of the steel will inadvertently catch those areas, then tear and lift up a triangle shaped m()th#r-fu@&er (so named in my shop). 

There is no good repair to these tears, even in a fresh sheet and you're back to either peeling, scraping and swearing or sharpening around the defect. Both are shitty options. 

A while ago I decided it was time to end the relationship, for the most part. Though it was the right decision, it was difficult to decide on a replacement. eventually I sat back and decided I've never been steered wrong by considering what my Grandpa would have done. He wouldn't have had a thousand waterstone and diamond infused plate options and twice as many voices proclaiming a better way. He's have gone to the local hardware store, bought an oil stone or two and some honing oil. Maybe polished the blade on a leather strop. 

Bingo. My answer. 


Yesterday the mailman delivered two new stones. Today I'll  go about making a dedicated tray to hold them steady in use, Then I'll start touching up a couple chisel and plane blades. There might be a small return learning curve as I learn a new partner's proclivities, but I'll figure it out. And it i take care of these stones, they'll probably take care of me until the day I can no longer pick up a tool. That's a comforting thought. 

Ratione et Passionis
Oldwolf